Florida Snorkeler Discovers $1.5 million of Cocaine

Florida+Snorkelers+expects+to+find+marine+life+while+out+on+water+but+not+%241.5+million+worth+of+Cocaine.+

Photo By Pixabay.com

Florida Snorkelers expects to find marine life while out on water but not $1.5 million worth of Cocaine.

On Wednesday, March 5, a snorkeler diving off the coast of the Florida Keys discovered a bit more than just coral when they came across 25 bricks of cocaine inside a floating bale off the Florida Keys. According to the Monroe County Sheriff’s office, the drugs were valued at over $1.5 million. 

“The individual noticed a large black bundle wrapped in tape and contacted local authorities,” Chief Patrol Agent, Thomas G. Marin said. “The bag contained 25 bricks of cocaine.” 

The unidentified good Samaritan alerted authorities of the costly pounds that were found wrapped in tape and floating in the water. Neither local nor federal authorities have commented on the possible source of the drugs, but Florida water has a history of being used to hide packages of narcotics. In December 2020, a fisherman discovered over 75 pounds of cocaine floating off the Florida Keys, located 15 miles south of Sugarloaf Key. In August 2020, 150 pounds of marijuana were also uncovered washed up on the shore, and in two separate incidents, almost 80 pounds of cocaine were found in the same location.  

“Drug traffickers began to look for alternative routes for the smuggling of heroin – by sea,” News Financial Buzz said. “The bulk of the cocaine continues to be transported by sea, as evidenced by the discovery of large consignments in European ports.”

Law enforcement says the impact of the pandemic has led to traffickers having limited options for transporting drugs between the U.S. and South America. Due to the fewer flights and canceled cruises, those searching for transportation routes for narcotics have been unable to find them. 

“The flow has been hampered by the pandemic,” Acting Special Agent in charge of South Florida’s Drug Enforcement Administration, Keith Wis, said. “All the drug traffickers are having a hard time recruiting couriers.”

The Miami Herald reported that the recent discoveries appeared to be part of a growing trend of unclaimed narcotic shipments in the area. It was reported that the prices of illegal drugs have skyrocketed as a result of lower supplies in South Florida, which is causing a climb between 20 to 50 percent in value. COVID-19 may have an impact on the street value as well, with fewer people on the streets making it more difficult for deals to go unnoticed. Local and border authorities have chosen to not release any other information at this time. 

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email