Texas Voters Prepare For May 7 Election

Texass+May+7+Election+will+determine+what+changes+will+be+made+to+statewide+tax+collecting+procedures.+For+residents+of+Austin%2C+an+additional+proposition+regarding+no-knock+warrants+and+enforcement+of+marijuana+use+will+also+be+on+the+ballot.+%0AGraphic+by+Yunoo+Kim

Texas’s May 7 Election will determine what changes will be made to statewide tax collecting procedures. For residents of Austin, an additional proposition regarding no-knock warrants and enforcement of marijuana use will also be on the ballot. Graphic by Yunoo Kim

By Yunoo Kim, Community & World News Editor

On Saturday, May 7, voters across Texas will be able to vote in the state’s uniform election. Early voting for the election began on Monday, April 25, and will end on Tuesday, May 3. 

On the ballot are two statewide propositions that focus on lowering property taxes. More specifically, Proposition 1 is a Texas constitutional amendment that would allow the legislature to lower property taxes for elderly or disabled residents. Proposition 2, on the other hand, is a Texas constitutional amendment that would allow homeowners to subtract more from their taxes by increasing homestead exemptions for school district property taxes from $25,000 to $40,000. These amendments do not benefit renters or anyone who does not own their home. 

“People see the need for property tax relief, and Texans are going to cry out for that continuously. This is a great way to bring that home to all of the taxpayers of Texas,” State Senator Paul Bettencourt, the author of Proposition 2, said. 

Residents of Austin are also prompted to vote on Proposition A, which would decriminalize minor instances of marijuana use as well as prevent the use of ‘no-knock warrants’, which permit police officers to enter private property without alerting the residents immediately beforehand. 

“I think we’re in a community that [has a] value that we’re not going to arrest and prosecute people for low-level drug charges with marijuana. I think that’s important. And quite frankly, there’s remedial action that needs to be taken,” said Austin Mayor Steve Adler at a city council meeting. “And I think we’ve all seen the problems associated with no-knock entry on to property that put[s] everybody in danger. And this gives us a chance now to have a conversation about the best way to implement those policies.”

More information about the election can be found here